3D printing gains prominence in the U.S.

Screenshot from Anastasia Talalaeva's LUTV footage 3D Printers are being used for more and more purposes around the world.

Anastasia Talalaeva | Contributing Report
Published March 20, 2015; 1 p.m.

Although 3-dimensional printers are not a new technology, they have become popular in recent years. Today people use these printers as a source for business, with some companies using 3D printing for advertisement. Scientists are even trying to use these printers for transplants, and some tests have been successful.

Lindenwood Communications professor Jason Lively explained more about the various uses of 3D printing.

“There are printers now that can print a house,” Lively said. “I know there are some companies in California that are doing this. They have these giant printers in a warehouse and they can print the entire structure wired for electric and plumbing. In China, they were able to print five homes in 24 hours with one printer.”

Some people do not use these printers to build houses, but to build their businesses.

A small company named Physical 3D is not only creating things for their customers but also building the 3D printers with their bare hands.

“Some of the stuff I have done are gears and pulleys for local companies,” said Bill Plemmons, owner of Physical 3D. “I did some military stuff.”

Screenshot from Anastasia Talalaeva's LUTV footage 3D Printers are being used for more and more purposes around the world.
Screenshot from Anastasia Talalaeva’s LUTV footage
3D Printers are being used for more and more purposes around the world.

It is possible that 3D printers will become an even more common facet of people’s lives. However, there is a concern that these printers will affect the copyright rules.

Kim Gordon, a professor of Communications at Lindenwood University, explained the restriction issues.

“What we suspect we are going to see is a great unfolding of creative materials that replicate in 3D printing environment, at absolutely no copyright restrictions, Gordon said. “Now if you stop to think about it, a large majority of products that we use every day of our life have no copyright restrictions.”

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Legacy/Lindenlink Editor-in-Chief and President of the Society of Professional Journalists, Emily is an all-around information aficionado with further aspirations in content creation. She studies journalism and political science. She also adores jigsaw puzzles.