Opinion: It’s time Lindenwood starts to implement coed campus living

According to Guffey, the university is exploring the idea of some residence hallsl being female or male by floor.
Photo by Nao Enomoto

One of the things that makes Lindenwood like no other, apparently, is that our housing options are completely separated by gender.

According to Live Science, more than 90 percent of colleges have coed dorm options. Some colleges, such as Washington University in St. Louis, are going to start offering mixed-gender housing, allowing male and female students to live in the same suites, and in some schools, the same room.

Now I think sharing a room or a suite with the opposite gender is a huge jump from where we are currently — I’m not even completely sold on the idea, to tell you the truth. But I do think that Lindenwood is way too far behind in the rooming options.

Before President Dennis Spellmann, Lindenwood had coed dorm buildings, but an obituary for the president in the New York Times cites him as the one who changed the system to the one we currently know.

Ultimately, each living situation may appeal to different students. Personally, however, I feel that we need to start allowing men and women to live in the same building.

Many students push for this living situation because of social aspects of being able to live close to friends, regardless of sex.What is often looked over, however, is the recruitment potential.

When people ask me about my experience at Lindenwood, it is full of good things. I think the education I’m getting is quality, I’ve never had an issue with the food and I am surrounded by peers and professors who support and push me.

When it comes to housing though, most people make a displeased face when I explain that the dorms are gender by building.

Potential college students are looking for a great education, but also a thriving social life, something that for many prospective students is reflected by the living situations.

It would be a drastic change to adjust all of the dormitories, but if the university started small, the adjustment would be successful. Starting with one or two buildings where the sexes are separated by floor could be a simple start to work out any issues.

This could eventually lead to more buildings doing the same, and potentially even mixing the floors, having only male and female suites.

I love how unique Lindenwood is and the great things it offers, but the university needs to take a step into the 21st century and start toward making the dormitories coed.

Facebook Comments
643 Total Views 2 Views Today
Print Friendly