Scuba diving class makes splash at Lindenwood

In 2016, participants of Lindenwood’s first scuba class practice in Butler pool.
Photo by Mai Urai

Lena Kirchner | Reporter
March 22, 2016; 5:30 p.m.

Participants of Lindenwood’s first scuba class practice diving in the Bulter pool.
Photo by Mai Urai

The first scuba diving class offered at Lindenwood will help students who want to pursue an underwater archaeological career.

Upon completion of the course, a late-start class which began on Feb. 24, students will receive their scuba diving certification from the Professional Association of Diving Instructors.

Steve Dasovich, assistant professor and chair of the Anthropology and Sociology Department, said he believes the class is a great addition to the department of Sport and Recreation.

“Some students want to have an underwater archaeology career, and that is the first thing they need for that,” Dasovich said.

Dasovich, who has scuba diving certificates and experience, is not an instructor, and will only be coordinating the class. Midwest Scuba, a scuba dive shop about four minutes away from campus, provided the instructor for the class.

“The class has been on our catalogue for years, but never was held,” Dasovich said. “Some of my students showed interest in underwater archaeology, so I went to the recreation department and asked for permission to operate the class.”

A few of the students currently in the class are interested in getting their scuba certification, such as Greg Judge.

“I’ve been scuba diving before in Hawaii, with my family,” Judge said. “It might be useful if I go anywhere else.”

A combination of theoretical diving lessons and practical pool practices make up class sessions, which take place at Midwest Scuba located on West Clark Street where students have theoretical lessons. However, there are scuba sessions in Butler pool once a week.

“I was really nervous during a scuba session, but it was fun,” said Saana Ahokas, a student in the class. “I travel a lot, so it (the certification) might be usefull.”

Students in the class practice diving without get to work on their technique.
Photo by Mai Urai

At the end of the semester, the participants will then complete open-water dives during a weekend in Rolla in April.
Dasovich is unsure if the class will be taught again in the future, but because of the required open water dive at the end of the class, it can only be taught during a spring semester.

However, reception for the class has been positive, such as Samuel Rudloff, a student in the class, who said he loves being in it.

The first class took place on Feb. 24, which was an open orientation for the eight people currently enrolled in the class.

“I was really nervous during a scuba session, but it was fun,” said Saana Ahokas, a student in the class. “I travel a lot, so it (the certification) might be useful.”

At the end of the semester, the participants will then complete open-water dives during a weekend in Rolla, Missouri in April.

Dasovich is unsure if the class will be taught again in the future, but because of the required open water dive at the end of the class, it can only be taught during a spring semester.

However, reception for the class has been positive, such as Samuel Rudloff, a student in the class, who said he loves being in it.

The first class took place on Feb. 24, which was an open orientation for the eight people currently enrolled in the class.

Facebook Comments