The Season of Giving

Jennifer Foster snapped this photo in Times Square showing NYPD officer Lawrence DePrimo giving a homeless man socks and boots. The image has swept through social media sites and made its way to the news networks.

Jennifer Foster snapped this photo in Times Square showing NYPD officer Lawrence DePrimo giving a homeless man socks and boots. The image has swept through social media sites and made its way to the news networks.

Amanda Young | Managing Reporter Editor

As the weeks bring us closer to Christmas Day, we are constantly bombarded by television ads for new gadgets and the next big thingie-majig. Shiny items in the front of the store beg for our attention and pocketbooks. Before long, we’ll eventually give in to the demand of purchasing the “perfect” gifts for our friends and family.

Fast-forward one week, two weeks, and it’s a month after Christmas. Now attempt to find that oh-so-precious gift that you received or even gave to someone special.

Whether or not you or someone else are still using the presents is not the point. Maybe you will use the gift every day for the rest of your life. In the end, the importance and appreciation felt at the moment you ripped the shiny bow and decorative paper off has faded.

A recent story making its way through the national news as well as social media is the tale behind a picture of an NYC police officer.

A tourist visiting the city noticed an apparently homeless man sitting alone in Time Square. Soon after making this observation, she saw NYPD officer Lawrence DePrimo approach the

Jennifer Foster snapped this photo in Times Square showing NYPD officer Lawrence DePrimo giving a homeless man socks and boots. The image has swept through social media sites and made its way to the news networks.

man, kneel down, and present him with a pair of thermal socks and new boots.

The nameless man in need may use this present every day for a long time and, chances are, he will appreciate that police officer’s kindness every time he laces up those shoes.

Not everyone passes a shoeless man when walking around campus, but how many times do you walk past the red Salvation Army buckets every year? Do you see the need and act accordingly, or do you clutch your wallet a little bit tighter, avert your eyes, and increase your pace so you can keep that extra five dollars you plan to spend on yourself or someone else?

Even away from the Christmas season, we struggle to give to others. But this year, challenge yourself to donate something — your time, money, prayers — to people who need more than a shiny new electronic to make it through the day.