Cinema Arts capstones screening first held in Scheidegger

Leonardo+Panziera+%28second+from+right%29+speaks+after+the+screening.++Panziera+intends+to+graduate+in+December%2C+and+his+capstone+film%2C+%E2%80%9CCamellia%2C%E2%80%9D+won+an+audience%E2%80%99s+choice+award+for+cinematography.++%3Cbr%3E+Photo+by+Matt+Hampton
Back to Article
Back to Article

Cinema Arts capstones screening first held in Scheidegger

Leonardo Panziera (second from right) speaks after the screening.  Panziera intends to graduate in December, and his capstone film, “Camellia,” won an audience’s choice award for cinematography.   Photo by Matt Hampton

Leonardo Panziera (second from right) speaks after the screening. Panziera intends to graduate in December, and his capstone film, “Camellia,” won an audience’s choice award for cinematography.
Photo by Matt Hampton

Leonardo Panziera (second from right) speaks after the screening. Panziera intends to graduate in December, and his capstone film, “Camellia,” won an audience’s choice award for cinematography.
Photo by Matt Hampton

Leonardo Panziera (second from right) speaks after the screening. Panziera intends to graduate in December, and his capstone film, “Camellia,” won an audience’s choice award for cinematography.
Photo by Matt Hampton

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


MATT HAMPTON | Sports Editor

A screening of 15 short films created by Digital Cinema Arts students was held May 8 in the Lindenwood Theater in the J. Scheidegger Center.

Digital Cinema Arts professor Andrew Millians said the capstone class was tied for the largest in his time at Lindenwood.  The screening traditionally occurs in Young Hall, but the auditorium was “bursting at the seams” with attendees in the past. Millians said professors looked at off-campus venues for this year’s event, and then decided to move it to Scheidegger.

Millians said the box office estimated Wednesday’s screening had an attendance as high as 300.  

“We had a lot of theatre students there, and people from the community have started to show up, and so it’s a pretty phenomenal event,” he said. “I think it speaks to the quality of the program.  I think it speaks to the students getting out and making themselves known and making films that people want to come and support.”

The films took over three hours in total, including a short intermission.  Afterwards, the audience had a question and answer session with the directors and voted on awards through an app.

“Extroversion,” a film by Artima Sakulkoo, was the audience’s choice for best film. “Extroversion” was Sakulkoo’s second capstone film as a requirement for her Bachelor of Fine Arts, and she also won awards for best cameo and best director for the movie.

The award for best cinematography went to Vega Oliveras for “Camellia,” and the vote for best editing resulted in a tie between Leonardo Panziera and Valerie Royer.  

The following are all the capstone films shown at the screening and their directors:

  • “Why Did James Drop Out?” by Antonio Davis
  • “90’s Baby” by Kyle Grande
  • “OASIS” by Olivia Helmlinger
  • “Give Me A Reason” by Carleeka Kimmins
  • “Influence” by Lindenlink Editor-in-Chief Mitchell Kraus
  • “A Way Out” by Gavin Lewis
  • “Camellia” by Leonardo Panziera
  • “Little Venice’s Path Towards Virtue” by Juan Requena
  • “Blood Trails” by Daniel Rothermich
  • “Jerad Davis Throws A Dinner Party” by Valerie Royer
  • “Extroversion” by  Artima Sakulkoo
  • “Cheap Date” by Sam Skaggs
  • “The Most Important Skill” by Joyce Techa
  • “The Final Hour of Roger Lawrence” by Truman Wheeler
  • “Saving Eve in 1988” by Judge L. Williams II